Getting Around Japan Efficiently

Many people see going to Japan as a lifelong dream. The imagery of sakura flowers blooming across a street, a dazzling nightlife, and who can forget all the cute clothes and gifts only for sale in this country; are all little things that can cause Japan frantic to drool. But even though many of these travellers are not from Asia, and in fact can’t even speak Japanese, several precautions need to be taken in order for you to stay safe.

Learning to speak Japanese is not an easy task. I personally know several people that have attempted to master the language only ending up failing like a dying fish. However thanks to technology, you can always simply purchase an electronic dictionary that can translate English to Japanese and then use it as an aid to communicate. I always recommend this method to my friends.

There are actually several times when some of my friends weren’t able to communicate with the Japanese people and ended up missing their flight and causing errors to their hotel bookings that caused them to lose hundreds of dollars. If only they had some sort of device that could bring down the language barrier they would have been able to avoid all these disasters.

Before flying out, the first and most important thing to do is to have bought insurance. This is a must if you want to reduce the chance of you losing your belongings and even money. There are many different companies that can offer you great deals and coverage for as little as a few dollars a day. If you are from Australia, I suggest you read through these travel insurance reviews to get some more information.

One of the companies that I suggest is 1Cover. They have been known to offer cheap policies by selling their service online and minimising the overhead costs of having an office and branch. Feel free to go read through this 1Cover review to get some idea of what you can take out.

Another company is Travel Insurance Direct. They also sell their policies online making their prices extra cheaper, but what make them stand out from the others is the fact that coupon codes seem to be always available, letting you save another 10%! To see all the great things about TID, check out this Travel Insurance Direct review.

Lastly, one of the simplest ways to get along in Japan is to join a tour. Many people forget about this idea because a lot of the prices are expensive, however the advantages can be endless. You will be able to get an expert to guide you along the cosy streets of Tokyo and have them explain about the history of some of these places. It is a great way to learn more about the country without all the stress of not being able to speak their language.

As a conclusion, travelling to Japan can be a very fun experience but at the same time, it can be a nightmare if you can’t speak Japanese. So the next time you head over there, make sure you have something that can translate English to Japanese, take out insurance, and if you can afford it, join a tour. All these steps will ensure you have a great time in the great country of the east and enjoy a slice of heaven.

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2 thoughts on “Getting Around Japan Efficiently

  1. Know any reputable tour companies I could do some research on what expensive actually means? Also it is possible that our family could take along our young hip friend who happens to be in a wheel chair. Any comments on accessibility in Japan.

  2. I have not used a tour company and I’m not sure which ones are the best. You could do some research using Google or Bing.com or http://www.lonelyplanet.com/asia or http://www.bootsnall.com/asia

    Here are a few companies that seem to be good, but I haven’t used them:
    http://www.alljapantours.com/
    http://online.jtbusa.com/
    http://www.jtb.co.jp/shop/itdw/info/e/

    Here’s an official tourism guide:
    http://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/

    And you can check user reviews on Trip Advisor – here’s a forum post I found http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g1066443-i17736-k5553240-Japanese_Tour_Companies-Chiyoda_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefecture_Kanto.html

    If a person is in a wheelchair I don’t see any problem. They should be able to offer assistance on public transportation, and buildings usually have elevators. I’m not a pro in this department so hopefully somebody else can add more info or you might find it doing some searching online. Some temples and castles have a lot of steps but I never looked for a wheelchair accessible entrance. Also you should tell each tour company that you consider using and they should be able to give you more direct answers.

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